FIFA inspects new artificial turf at Peru’s El Nacional stadium

Good news for Jose Diaz. The artificial turf at Lima’s ‘El Nacional’ Stadium, a.k.a. ‘Estadio Coloso de José Díaz’, has been given two stars from a FIFA inspector and is ready to go for the upcoming 2010 World Cup qualification matches.FIFA delegate Eric Harrison (England) said after his meticulous inspection that the two stars means “first quality and is the highest certification granted to artificial pitches in the world”.

This “FIFA recommended 2-Star certification” (comprising individual tests after installation) is the prerequisite for the official approval of artificial turf playing surfaces for national and international competitions.

The only complaint Harrison had was the level of silicone grains spread out over the field that come to the surface on various spots. “The artificial grass fibers have the correct length and once the silicone situation is corrected and the grains are removed, players, coaches and FIFA will be very happy and satisfied”, Harrison remarked.

However, Peru’s football federation has already announced it may select Cusco as the primary venue for its home games because of its high altitude to which visiting teams would have to adapt. It remains to be seen how many games will actually be played in Peru’s national stadium.

The 2010 Football World Cup is scheduled to take place between 11 June and 11 July 2010 in South Africa. It will be the first time that the tournament has been held on the African continent, leaving Oceania as the only populated continent never to have hosted the event.

All football confederations have yet to start the qualification process for this World Cup. The South American CONMEBOL qualification process will again feature a league system (home and away matches) for a single group of 10 associations. The provisional start date is September or October 2007.

By disposition of the world’s main football entity, this Preliminary Round will only be played in stadiums where all spectators are seated.

Wolfy Becker

Peru’s inflation over last 45 years is 216 billion per cent

A math degree doesn’t seem to help here, asking an astronomy expert instead seems to be more appropriate. According to an analysis of the Bradesco bank published in Thrusday’s edition of the Folha de Sao Paulo newspaper, Brazil leads the world-wide ranking of inflation over the last 45 years with more than 14.21 quadrillion percent – that is 14,210 trillion or 14,210,480,006,034.800 %.

The study considers cost of living increases between 1961 and 2006 and the four countries with highest inflation during this period are Brazil, Argentina, Peru and Uruguay. In fifth place follows Turkey and another South American country, Chile comes in sixth.

“Brazil’s inflation is a cosmic result, to measure it precisely one must resort to astronomic units”, said Boris Tabacof, director of the econmic department of CIESP.

In the same period, Argentina’s inflation was more than 256 trillion percent and Peru more than 216 billion. Uruguay’s percentage of 2 billion is actually quite moderate compared to the previous countries.
Brazil controlled its inflation beginning in July 1994 with the launching of the ‘Plan Real’ during the government of president Itamar Franco (1992-1995). More recently the increase in costs of living was 7.60% in 2004, 5.69% in 2005 and 3.14% in 2006. For 2007 an inflation below 4.5% is expected.

Beyond this peculiar exercise, Bradesco’s director for macroeconomic studies, Octávio de Barros, considered that those numbers – along with “the negligence in areas like education” – help to explain the enormous economic and social abyss that persists in
Brazil and the rest of Latin America.

These astronomical indexes are mainly from what was called the “years of hyperinflation” in the decades of the 70’s and 80’s which were especially intense in South American countries.

According to the analysis, the best results between 1961 and the 2006 had Norway (916 percent), Sweden (922 percent) and Australia and Denmark, both with a 1,018 percent.

In mainstream economics, the word “inflation” refers to a general rise in prices measured against a standard level of purchasing power. Inflation is measured by comparing two sets of goods at two points in time, and computing the increase in cost not reflected by an increase in quality. There are, therefore, many measures of inflation depending on the specific circumstances. The most well known are the CPI which measures consumer prices, and the GDP deflator, which measures inflation in the whole of the domestic economy.

The prevailing view in mainstream economics is that inflation is caused by the interaction of the supply of money with output and interest rates.

Wolfy Becker

Lima, Peru: Myriam Hernandez pays tribute to late Colombian singer Soraya

Chilean pop-singer Myriam Hernandez announced her upcoming concert in Lima on Thursday, in which she will present her latest music project called “Huellas” (Tracks/Footprints). The CD contains many songs that were composed and dedicated for her late friend, Colombian-American singer Soraya who died of breast cancer almost a year ago at the age of 37.

Peruvians will finally get the chance to see and listen to this special tribute for the first time. Hernandez’ only concert in Lima has been scheduled for May 9th at the Vertice of the Museo de la Nacion and will commemorate the first anniversary of Soraya’s untimely death.

Myriam Hernandez is recognizable throughout Latin America for her powerful vocals and romantic songs. She also found fame in other parts of the world among discerning fans of pop music. “Huellas” is her greatest hits album, with the singles that got her noticed in her native Chile and eventually made her a household name there. Its original release in 2004 represented Hernandez’s attempt to capture mass audience appeal outside of a Spanish-speaking audience.

The CD features hits such as “Te Parceces Tanto a El”, “Herida”, “No Te He Robado Nada”, “Mio”, “El Amor De Mi Vida” and the song “He Vuelto Por Ti”. The title track was produced by the acclaimed producer Humberto Gattica who also produced for such famous artists like Celine Dion.

Myriam is in many ways connected to Peru and it’s a special coincidence that the concert will be held on the eve of her daughter’s birthday.

The tribute show named “Contigo” (with you) – which includes special effects such as artificial rain and also several dance performances.

Soraya, who won a 2004 Latin Grammy Award as “Best Album by Songwriter” for her self-titled album, was a U.S. citizen born in Point Pleasant, New Jersey, one year after her father, mother, and brother moved to the United States from Colombia. Her family was forced to move back to Colombia, but when Soraya was eight years old, they returned to New Jersey.

She toured and opened for famous musicians such as Natalie Merchant, Zucchero, Sting, Michael Bolton, and Alanis Morissette.

Unfortunately, her breast cancer was diagnosed shortly after the release of her third album — just before she was about to tour to promote it. Yet, Soraya created two more successful albums before she finally succumbed to the disease on May 10th, 2006.

Peru upgrades Nasca Lines, Amazon river head, Kuelap as tourist hot spot

Peru’s tourism minister Mercedes Aráoz announced on Thursday that in 2007 S/. 8.7 million Nuevo Soles (US$ 2.75 million) will be allocated to upgrade the popular Nasca lines as a tourist hot spot. From that money, 1.7 million soles will be used to improve access routes and 2 million soles will be invested in the construction of a so-called interpretation center over the next 5 years.

“We will also implement a tourist safety system and vehicle access control which are very important”, she said and added that “the Nasca lines have a great attractiveness”. She used specifically the many Japanese tourists as an example who choose the Nasca lines as their second favorite destination after the city of Cusco and the nearby Inca ruins of Machu Picchu.

She emphasized that the impending development of the nearby airport in Pisco, whose concession has recently been sold to Swissport GBH Perú, will provide a major step in handling a increasing flow of tourists and emerge as an important alternative to Lima’s Jorge Chávez international airport.

Pisco is a city in the Ica Region of Peru, the capital of the Pisco Province. The city is only 28 feet above sea level. Pisco originally prospered because of its vineyards, and is the namesake of the Peruvian grape liquor, pisco. The area is also visited because of the concentration of marine animals and birds at the Paracas National Reserve, or the Peruvian Galapagos.

Aráoz also informed that this month the tourism fair “Peru Travel Mart 2007″ will open its doors that attracts numerous foreign tourist operators. The attractiveness of Ica, Pisco and Nasca will be featured during this fair.

Taking advantage of the Amazon River head will also become a new focus in attracting new visitors to Peru.

“This year we have funds of approximately 800,000 soles to begin the development of this project. In addition we have another 70,000 soles (trough ProInversión) that we use to add value to the district of Belén (not to be confused with Belem, at the mouth of the Amazon in Brazil).

Other investments will benefit the historical center of Chachapoyas and the nearby Kuelap fortress in northern Peru which Araoz described as a tourist attraction with great potential.

“We are going to invest S/. 4.6 million soles in these areas, but not only in that. Over the next years until 2013 we hope to invest a total of about S/. 70 million in Kuelap and surrounding areas”, she announced.

Article by Wolfy Becker

Peru’s Prime Minister humbly admits mistake

Peru’s prime minister Jorge del Castillo is currently addressing the Parliament in regard to his ill-fated appointment of Alberto Pandolfi, ex-minister under the Alberto Fujimori regime, as executive director for the National ‘El Niño’ Prevention Program. Del Castillo acknowledged that the designation was “a political mistake”.

“I humbly admit this was a mistake (…) I didn’t know the criteria that disqualified this person from taking the job”, he declared during his speech before the plenary session of Congress.

“I have come here with the truth and I tell you from my heart that I wasn’t acting in bad faith”, he remarked. Del Castillo said he was sorry that Pandolfi had not warned him that the state apparatus had issued a 10-year ban against him a few years ago which disqualified him from assuming any public position.

The head of the ministerial cabinet sharply denied any accusations that the Executive is infested with corruption and follows the footpaths of the Fujimori regime, saying that the Apra party has fought against “all forms of corruption at all times, decade after decade”, as well as defending democracy on the streets.

“Today many people display the Fujimori regime as a democracy, but when it was a dictatorship they shut their mouths, no matter the language”, he emphasized. Del Castillo expressed that some members of the opposition were once “collaborators of the fujimorismo” and now they are using the democracy to “come clean” and insult the Apra party that has always “defended democracy in the first trenches”.

“I have neither a political relation with corruption nor with undemocratic groups”, he clarified. “I am a little irritated. They were hiding for years, they never said anything, they never raised their voice in defending democracy. Where were they during the Fujimori regime?” he asked.

Later, Fujimorista legislator Rolando Souza criticized some people, including the prime minister, tie the Fujimori regime with corruption and added that his political group deserves more respect because it represents an important part of the electorate. He said that “Fujimorismo is different from Montesinismo”, and remembered that a judicial resolution that condemns Pandolfi doesn’t exist.

Vladimiro Montesinos was the long-time, powerful head of Peru’s intelligence service (SIN) under President Alberto Fujimori. In 2000, secret videos were televised revealing him bribing a politician and the ensuing scandal caused Montesinos to flee the country, later contributing to the resignation of the administration of Alberto Fujimori. Subsequent investigations revealed Montesinos was at the centre of a vast web of illegal activities, including embezzlement, graft, and drug trafficking. He is currently serving multiple prison terms on corruption, bribery, abuse of power and embezzlemet charges at the top-security naval prison in the port of Callao.

The debate in Congress is still ongoing.

Article by Wolfy Becker

FIFA inspects new artificial turf at Peru’s El Nacional stadium

Good news for Jose Diaz. The artificial turf at Lima’s ‘El Nacional’ Stadium, a.k.a. ‘Estadio Coloso de José Díaz’, has been given two stars from a FIFA inspector and is ready to go for the upcoming 2010 World Cup qualification matches.FIFA delegate Eric Harrison (England) said after his meticulous inspection that the two stars means “first quality and is the highest certification granted to artificial pitches in the world”.

This “FIFA recommended 2-Star certification” (comprising individual tests after installation) is the prerequisite for the official approval of artificial turf playing surfaces for national and international competitions.

The only complaint Harrison had was the level of silicone grains spread out over the field that come to the surface on various spots. “The artificial grass fibers have the correct length and once the silicone situation is corrected and the grains are removed, players, coaches and FIFA will be very happy and satisfied”, Harrison remarked.

However, Peru’s football federation has already announced it may select Cusco as the primary venue for its home games because of its high altitude to which visiting teams would have to adapt. It remains to be seen how many games will actually be played in Peru’s national stadium.

The 2010 Football World Cup is scheduled to take place between 11 June and 11 July 2010 in South Africa. It will be the first time that the tournament has been held on the African continent, leaving Oceania as the only populated continent never to have hosted the event.

All football confederations have yet to start the qualification process for this World Cup. The South American CONMEBOL qualification process will again feature a league system (home and away matches) for a single group of 10 associations. The provisional start date is September or October 2007.

By disposition of the world’s main football entity, this Preliminary Round will only be played in stadiums where all spectators are seated.

Wolfy Becker

Peru’s inflation over last 45 years is 216 billion per cent

A math degree doesn’t seem to help here, asking an astronomy expert instead seems to be more appropriate. According to an analysis of the Bradesco bank published in Thrusday’s edition of the Folha de Sao Paulo newspaper, Brazil leads the world-wide ranking of inflation over the last 45 years with more than 14.21 quadrillion percent – that is 14,210 trillion or 14,210,480,006,034.800 %.

The study considers cost of living increases between 1961 and 2006 and the four countries with highest inflation during this period are Brazil, Argentina, Peru and Uruguay. In fifth place follows Turkey and another South American country, Chile comes in sixth.

“Brazil’s inflation is a cosmic result, to measure it precisely one must resort to astronomic units”, said Boris Tabacof, director of the econmic department of CIESP.

In the same period, Argentina’s inflation was more than 256 trillion percent and Peru more than 216 billion. Uruguay’s percentage of 2 billion is actually quite moderate compared to the previous countries.
Brazil controlled its inflation beginning in July 1994 with the launching of the ‘Plan Real’ during the government of president Itamar Franco (1992-1995). More recently the increase in costs of living was 7.60% in 2004, 5.69% in 2005 and 3.14% in 2006. For 2007 an inflation below 4.5% is expected.

Beyond this peculiar exercise, Bradesco’s director for macroeconomic studies, Octávio de Barros, considered that those numbers – along with “the negligence in areas like education” – help to explain the enormous economic and social abyss that persists in
Brazil and the rest of Latin America.

These astronomical indexes are mainly from what was called the “years of hyperinflation” in the decades of the 70’s and 80’s which were especially intense in South American countries.

According to the analysis, the best results between 1961 and the 2006 had Norway (916 percent), Sweden (922 percent) and Australia and Denmark, both with a 1,018 percent.

In mainstream economics, the word “inflation” refers to a general rise in prices measured against a standard level of purchasing power. Inflation is measured by comparing two sets of goods at two points in time, and computing the increase in cost not reflected by an increase in quality. There are, therefore, many measures of inflation depending on the specific circumstances. The most well known are the CPI which measures consumer prices, and the GDP deflator, which measures inflation in the whole of the domestic economy.

The prevailing view in mainstream economics is that inflation is caused by the interaction of the supply of money with output and interest rates.

Wolfy Becker

Lima, Peru: Myriam Hernandez pays tribute to late Colombian singer Soraya

Chilean pop-singer Myriam Hernandez announced her upcoming concert in Lima on Thursday, in which she will present her latest music project called “Huellas” (Tracks/Footprints). The CD contains many songs that were composed and dedicated for her late friend, Colombian-American singer Soraya who died of breast cancer almost a year ago at the age of 37.

Peruvians will finally get the chance to see and listen to this special tribute for the first time. Hernandez’ only concert in Lima has been scheduled for May 9th at the Vertice of the Museo de la Nacion and will commemorate the first anniversary of Soraya’s untimely death.

Myriam Hernandez is recognizable throughout Latin America for her powerful vocals and romantic songs. She also found fame in other parts of the world among discerning fans of pop music. “Huellas” is her greatest hits album, with the singles that got her noticed in her native Chile and eventually made her a household name there. Its original release in 2004 represented Hernandez’s attempt to capture mass audience appeal outside of a Spanish-speaking audience.

The CD features hits such as “Te Parceces Tanto a El”, “Herida”, “No Te He Robado Nada”, “Mio”, “El Amor De Mi Vida” and the song “He Vuelto Por Ti”. The title track was produced by the acclaimed producer Humberto Gattica who also produced for such famous artists like Celine Dion.

Myriam is in many ways connected to Peru and it’s a special coincidence that the concert will be held on the eve of her daughter’s birthday.

The tribute show named “Contigo” (with you) – which includes special effects such as artificial rain and also several dance performances.

Soraya, who won a 2004 Latin Grammy Award as “Best Album by Songwriter” for her self-titled album, was a U.S. citizen born in Point Pleasant, New Jersey, one year after her father, mother, and brother moved to the United States from Colombia. Her family was forced to move back to Colombia, but when Soraya was eight years old, they returned to New Jersey.

She toured and opened for famous musicians such as Natalie Merchant, Zucchero, Sting, Michael Bolton, and Alanis Morissette.

Unfortunately, her breast cancer was diagnosed shortly after the release of her third album — just before she was about to tour to promote it. Yet, Soraya created two more successful albums before she finally succumbed to the disease on May 10th, 2006.

Peru upgrades Nasca Lines, Amazon river head, Kuelap as tourist hot spot

Peru’s tourism minister Mercedes Aráoz announced on Thursday that in 2007 S/. 8.7 million Nuevo Soles (US$ 2.75 million) will be allocated to upgrade the popular Nasca lines as a tourist hot spot. From that money, 1.7 million soles will be used to improve access routes and 2 million soles will be invested in the construction of a so-called interpretation center over the next 5 years.

“We will also implement a tourist safety system and vehicle access control which are very important”, she said and added that “the Nasca lines have a great attractiveness”. She used specifically the many Japanese tourists as an example who choose the Nasca lines as their second favorite destination after the city of Cusco and the nearby Inca ruins of Machu Picchu.

She emphasized that the impending development of the nearby airport in Pisco, whose concession has recently been sold to Swissport GBH Perú, will provide a major step in handling a increasing flow of tourists and emerge as an important alternative to Lima’s Jorge Chávez international airport.

Pisco is a city in the Ica Region of Peru, the capital of the Pisco Province. The city is only 28 feet above sea level. Pisco originally prospered because of its vineyards, and is the namesake of the Peruvian grape liquor, pisco. The area is also visited because of the concentration of marine animals and birds at the Paracas National Reserve, or the Peruvian Galapagos.

Aráoz also informed that this month the tourism fair “Peru Travel Mart 2007″ will open its doors that attracts numerous foreign tourist operators. The attractiveness of Ica, Pisco and Nasca will be featured during this fair.

Taking advantage of the Amazon River head will also become a new focus in attracting new visitors to Peru.

“This year we have funds of approximately 800,000 soles to begin the development of this project. In addition we have another 70,000 soles (trough ProInversión) that we use to add value to the district of Belén (not to be confused with Belem, at the mouth of the Amazon in Brazil).

Other investments will benefit the historical center of Chachapoyas and the nearby Kuelap fortress in northern Peru which Araoz described as a tourist attraction with great potential.

“We are going to invest S/. 4.6 million soles in these areas, but not only in that. Over the next years until 2013 we hope to invest a total of about S/. 70 million in Kuelap and surrounding areas”, she announced.

Article by Wolfy Becker

Peru’s Prime Minister humbly admits mistake

Peru’s prime minister Jorge del Castillo is currently addressing the Parliament in regard to his ill-fated appointment of Alberto Pandolfi, ex-minister under the Alberto Fujimori regime, as executive director for the National ‘El Niño’ Prevention Program. Del Castillo acknowledged that the designation was “a political mistake”.

“I humbly admit this was a mistake (…) I didn’t know the criteria that disqualified this person from taking the job”, he declared during his speech before the plenary session of Congress.

“I have come here with the truth and I tell you from my heart that I wasn’t acting in bad faith”, he remarked. Del Castillo said he was sorry that Pandolfi had not warned him that the state apparatus had issued a 10-year ban against him a few years ago which disqualified him from assuming any public position.

The head of the ministerial cabinet sharply denied any accusations that the Executive is infested with corruption and follows the footpaths of the Fujimori regime, saying that the Apra party has fought against “all forms of corruption at all times, decade after decade”, as well as defending democracy on the streets.

“Today many people display the Fujimori regime as a democracy, but when it was a dictatorship they shut their mouths, no matter the language”, he emphasized. Del Castillo expressed that some members of the opposition were once “collaborators of the fujimorismo” and now they are using the democracy to “come clean” and insult the Apra party that has always “defended democracy in the first trenches”.

“I have neither a political relation with corruption nor with undemocratic groups”, he clarified. “I am a little irritated. They were hiding for years, they never said anything, they never raised their voice in defending democracy. Where were they during the Fujimori regime?” he asked.

Later, Fujimorista legislator Rolando Souza criticized some people, including the prime minister, tie the Fujimori regime with corruption and added that his political group deserves more respect because it represents an important part of the electorate. He said that “Fujimorismo is different from Montesinismo”, and remembered that a judicial resolution that condemns Pandolfi doesn’t exist.

Vladimiro Montesinos was the long-time, powerful head of Peru’s intelligence service (SIN) under President Alberto Fujimori. In 2000, secret videos were televised revealing him bribing a politician and the ensuing scandal caused Montesinos to flee the country, later contributing to the resignation of the administration of Alberto Fujimori. Subsequent investigations revealed Montesinos was at the centre of a vast web of illegal activities, including embezzlement, graft, and drug trafficking. He is currently serving multiple prison terms on corruption, bribery, abuse of power and embezzlemet charges at the top-security naval prison in the port of Callao.

The debate in Congress is still ongoing.

Article by Wolfy Becker

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