Limenos believe violence has increased in Peru

Almost three quarter (74.9%) of Lima’s population believe that violence in Peru has increased in recent years, according to a survey conducted by the University of Lima.

The survey conducted in March questioned 613 inhabitants of Lima Metropolitan and Callao between the age of 18 – 70 years. According to the results, they believe that Peruvian society is violent (58.1%) or very violent (26.5%). This perception is clearly taking its toll on the population: 94.1% are worried or very concerned about this issue.

86.3% of Limeños think that the mass media incites violence in Peru, the most influential being television (58.2%), the Internet (21.3%) and the newspapers (13.7%).

However, it may come as a surprise that it’s actually not the movies and action series (20,6%) that induce violence the most; talk shows or reality shows are the front runner (38.3%).

Violence in sports was also put under the magnifying glass. According to the survey, 47.2% consider that violence in soccer is very high. 36.7% responded with “bastante” meaning “quite a bit” or “a good deal”.

Lack of security is also made evident among the citizenship. 51.4% think that there is “a lot” or “some” violence in their district, as opposed to 43.1% who said there’s only little. Violence in schools was also considered very high or much by 51.2%.

Limeños also believe that there’s a lot (46.9%) or enough (23,7%) violence in politics and a lot in jails (69.4%). Nevertheless, there are also more peaceful territories: for Limeños there is only little violence within families (47.2%) or none (22.9%).

Article by Wolfy Becker

Ex-president Fujimori blames Peru’s Army for crimes during his government

Peru’s ex-president Alberto Fujimori, who transformed a young Peruvian democracy into an authoritarian regime – some political experts referred to it “as a new breed of democracy” or a “delegative democracy” – continues to rely on his “three monkey” defense strategy (see no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil).

According to Omar Chehade, Peruvian official in charge of the extradition process and a member of Peru’s judge advocate general’s office, Fujimori blamed the Peruvian Army as being responsible for the crimes against humanity committing during his government (1990-2000), and for which Peru requested his extradition from Chile.

Chehade revealed on Wednesday that “Fujimori continues to deny that he ordered the murders”. Instead he claimed that the military command, or his defense ministers, or his interior minister were in charge of the operations that committed the crimes and he had no knowledge of it.

These remarks by Fujimori are part of his defense report that his lawyers handed to Chilean Supreme Court justice Orlando Alvarez who presides the court’s process on whether or not Chile will extradite Fujimori to Peru.

Peru’s extradition request contains ten charges of corruption and two for violating human rights, as a result of the murder of 15 people in Barrios Altos in 1991 and 10 people of the university La Cantuta in 1992 committed by the Colina death squad.

In an interview with the National Radio of the Peru, Chehade declared that the ex-president assured he had no knowledge of military tactics and intelligence strategies because his professional field of expertise is in mathematics (he attended the University of Wisconsin-Madison in the United States, where he obtained his master’s degree in mathematics in 1969).

“This is a classic picaresque argumentation. He washes his hands clean by redirecting any responsibility to the Peruvian Army”, Chehade said.

He added that the Office of Peru’ judge advocate general has documented that “everything in Peru was based on a systematic policy, a species of terrorism by the State that Fujimori applied in agreement with certain manuals and procedures installed during the beginning of his administration”.

Chehade also criticized that Fujimori’s defense counsel invoked the “sovereign immunity card” for ex-presidents, an argument with which they reject any criminal responsibility for the crimes committed during his rule”.

He remarked that the report submitted by Fujimori’s defense “is a ridicule of the country”.

The Chilean attorney general’s office will hand out its ruling on Fujimori’ extradition some time in April. The judicial process has already dragged for more than a year after Fujimori was arrested at Santiago de Chile’s airport in November 2005. Meanwhile, Fujimori was released from prison after 6 months and now enjoys conditional freedom in a rented mansion located in an upscale neighborhood of Chile’s capital of Santiago.

Article by Wolfy Becker

Peru tickles Europe to vote for Machu Picchu as new world wonder

Peru’s vice-minister for tourism, Eduardo Arriarte, announced the launch of a promotion campaign within the countries of the European Union to stimulate the vote for the ancient Inca sanctuary of Machu Picchu as one of the new 7 world wonders.

The campaign will be directed and supported by the Peruvian ambassador to Germany, Federico Kauffman Doig, who will prepare the events planned to promote Machu Picchu over the next few months. The new 7 wonders of the world will be announced during the official declaration ceremony in Lisbon, Portugal on Saturday, July 7, 2007.

Whether motivated by nationalism, conservation, curiosity or sheer boredom, more than 4 million Chinese, Indians, Mexicans, Brazilians, Americans and others have cast 28 million votes, organizers say. They have generated 21 wonder finalists which include also the Great Wall of China, the Taj Mahal, the Acropolis in Athens, Jordan’s ancient city of Petra and the pyramids of Giza.
Also in the running are Britain’s Stonehenge, the statues of Easter Island in Chile, the Eiffel Tower, the Statue of Liberty and the Sydney Opera House.

According to Tia Viering, a spokeswoman for the New7Wonders Foundation, as of Jan. 31, the top seven vote-getters were Petra, the pyramids, the Great Wall, the Taj Mahal, the Easter Island statues, the Colosseum in Rome and Machu Picchu. The Statue of Liberty has stubbornly remained in the bottom seven for most of the campaign, she said.

Article by Wolfy Becker

Peru’s undernourishment level is one of the highest in America

Worrisome numbers: the Pan-American Health Organization (PAHO) revealed that Peru’s undernourishment level is one of the highest in America. The organization especially emphasized the numbers for child undernourishment which haven’t changed over the last 10 years and tends to increase.

The PAHO representative in Peru, Manuel Peña, remarked that despite numerous aid campaigns and programs ascending to 250 million dollars annually, the numbers haven’t changed in years.

“The problem of child malnutrition will not be solved with better and more frequent nourishing”. Peña explained. It requires effective policies and actions from all parts of our society, integral nutritional interventions, and social investments focusing on the most vulnerable part of the population. We also need to improve the quality of education, public health care, and access to potable water and sanitation systems in order to increase productivity and the capacity of families to generate income”.

He said it’s necessary to consider the social determinants that affect children’s health: access to health services, houses that are connected to sanitation and sewage systems, potable water, vector control, nourishing security, consumption of iodized salt, adult alphabetization, education, etc.

The Peruvian regions with the highest levels of malnutrition are Cuzco with 50% of the population, followed by Huancavelica and Huánuco with 40% both. Peña recommended a strategy that focuses primarily on diminishing undernourishment in these areas.

The country’s common goal has to be reducing chronic undernourishment from 25% to 20% between 2006-2011, or one percent per year. In Peru the nationwide undernourishment level remained unimproved. It lowered in metropolitan areas but increased in rural and poorer areas which increased inequality among Peru’s population.

The statistics of the PAHO seem to be different than the numbers provided by the “Food and Agriculture Organization” (FAO) of the United Nations. Their 2006 analysis stated that Peru has a moderate level of undernourishment; 12 percent of the population is
undernourished. Both the proportion and the number of undernourished people have decreased from 1990-92, benchmark period of the World Food Summit (WFS) and the Millennium Declaration (MD), to 2002-04, the latest period available.

Article by Wolfy Becker

Senior adults in Lima, Peru will soon have free health care

Good news for all mature Peruvian adults: Beginning on April 1st 2007, Peruvian senior citizens will receive gratuitous medical attention at public hospitals in 22 districts of the capital of Lima.

This was announced on Monday by Peru’s health minister Carlos Vallejos, who explained that this is a pilot plan that offers integral medical attention to this vulnerable part of the population.

Vallejos said this service will initially be offered in the medical centers run by the Direction of Health (DISA) V – Lima City, which includes hospital in districts such as Cercado de Lima, Breña, Jesús María, Magdalena, San Miguel, La Victoria, San Luis, Lince, San Borja, Surquillo, San Isidro, Miraflores, Pueblo Libre, Puente Piedra, San Martín de Porres, Comas, Los Olivos, Rímac, Ancón, Independencia, Carabayllo and Canta.

The pilot plan also will also provide tips on therapies for various diseases and includes a prevention package for illnesses such arterial hypertension, diabetes, osteoporosis, cancer, and other common medical conditions older people have to deal with to minimize health risks.

According to the health ministry, 5,5% of all outpatient visits at state hospitals corresponds to mature adults, also known as the “third age”. However, estimates are that a large percentage d not receive any medical care due to the lack of economic resources. The objective of this pilot plan is to change that.

Wolfy Becker

Limenos believe violence has increased in Peru

Almost three quarter (74.9%) of Lima’s population believe that violence in Peru has increased in recent years, according to a survey conducted by the University of Lima.

The survey conducted in March questioned 613 inhabitants of Lima Metropolitan and Callao between the age of 18 – 70 years. According to the results, they believe that Peruvian society is violent (58.1%) or very violent (26.5%). This perception is clearly taking its toll on the population: 94.1% are worried or very concerned about this issue.

86.3% of Limeños think that the mass media incites violence in Peru, the most influential being television (58.2%), the Internet (21.3%) and the newspapers (13.7%).

However, it may come as a surprise that it’s actually not the movies and action series (20,6%) that induce violence the most; talk shows or reality shows are the front runner (38.3%).

Violence in sports was also put under the magnifying glass. According to the survey, 47.2% consider that violence in soccer is very high. 36.7% responded with “bastante” meaning “quite a bit” or “a good deal”.

Lack of security is also made evident among the citizenship. 51.4% think that there is “a lot” or “some” violence in their district, as opposed to 43.1% who said there’s only little. Violence in schools was also considered very high or much by 51.2%.

Limeños also believe that there’s a lot (46.9%) or enough (23,7%) violence in politics and a lot in jails (69.4%). Nevertheless, there are also more peaceful territories: for Limeños there is only little violence within families (47.2%) or none (22.9%).

Article by Wolfy Becker

Ex-president Fujimori blames Peru’s Army for crimes during his government

Peru’s ex-president Alberto Fujimori, who transformed a young Peruvian democracy into an authoritarian regime – some political experts referred to it “as a new breed of democracy” or a “delegative democracy” – continues to rely on his “three monkey” defense strategy (see no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil).

According to Omar Chehade, Peruvian official in charge of the extradition process and a member of Peru’s judge advocate general’s office, Fujimori blamed the Peruvian Army as being responsible for the crimes against humanity committing during his government (1990-2000), and for which Peru requested his extradition from Chile.

Chehade revealed on Wednesday that “Fujimori continues to deny that he ordered the murders”. Instead he claimed that the military command, or his defense ministers, or his interior minister were in charge of the operations that committed the crimes and he had no knowledge of it.

These remarks by Fujimori are part of his defense report that his lawyers handed to Chilean Supreme Court justice Orlando Alvarez who presides the court’s process on whether or not Chile will extradite Fujimori to Peru.

Peru’s extradition request contains ten charges of corruption and two for violating human rights, as a result of the murder of 15 people in Barrios Altos in 1991 and 10 people of the university La Cantuta in 1992 committed by the Colina death squad.

In an interview with the National Radio of the Peru, Chehade declared that the ex-president assured he had no knowledge of military tactics and intelligence strategies because his professional field of expertise is in mathematics (he attended the University of Wisconsin-Madison in the United States, where he obtained his master’s degree in mathematics in 1969).

“This is a classic picaresque argumentation. He washes his hands clean by redirecting any responsibility to the Peruvian Army”, Chehade said.

He added that the Office of Peru’ judge advocate general has documented that “everything in Peru was based on a systematic policy, a species of terrorism by the State that Fujimori applied in agreement with certain manuals and procedures installed during the beginning of his administration”.

Chehade also criticized that Fujimori’s defense counsel invoked the “sovereign immunity card” for ex-presidents, an argument with which they reject any criminal responsibility for the crimes committed during his rule”.

He remarked that the report submitted by Fujimori’s defense “is a ridicule of the country”.

The Chilean attorney general’s office will hand out its ruling on Fujimori’ extradition some time in April. The judicial process has already dragged for more than a year after Fujimori was arrested at Santiago de Chile’s airport in November 2005. Meanwhile, Fujimori was released from prison after 6 months and now enjoys conditional freedom in a rented mansion located in an upscale neighborhood of Chile’s capital of Santiago.

Article by Wolfy Becker

Peru tickles Europe to vote for Machu Picchu as new world wonder

Peru’s vice-minister for tourism, Eduardo Arriarte, announced the launch of a promotion campaign within the countries of the European Union to stimulate the vote for the ancient Inca sanctuary of Machu Picchu as one of the new 7 world wonders.

The campaign will be directed and supported by the Peruvian ambassador to Germany, Federico Kauffman Doig, who will prepare the events planned to promote Machu Picchu over the next few months. The new 7 wonders of the world will be announced during the official declaration ceremony in Lisbon, Portugal on Saturday, July 7, 2007.

Whether motivated by nationalism, conservation, curiosity or sheer boredom, more than 4 million Chinese, Indians, Mexicans, Brazilians, Americans and others have cast 28 million votes, organizers say. They have generated 21 wonder finalists which include also the Great Wall of China, the Taj Mahal, the Acropolis in Athens, Jordan’s ancient city of Petra and the pyramids of Giza.
Also in the running are Britain’s Stonehenge, the statues of Easter Island in Chile, the Eiffel Tower, the Statue of Liberty and the Sydney Opera House.

According to Tia Viering, a spokeswoman for the New7Wonders Foundation, as of Jan. 31, the top seven vote-getters were Petra, the pyramids, the Great Wall, the Taj Mahal, the Easter Island statues, the Colosseum in Rome and Machu Picchu. The Statue of Liberty has stubbornly remained in the bottom seven for most of the campaign, she said.

Article by Wolfy Becker

Peru’s undernourishment level is one of the highest in America

Worrisome numbers: the Pan-American Health Organization (PAHO) revealed that Peru’s undernourishment level is one of the highest in America. The organization especially emphasized the numbers for child undernourishment which haven’t changed over the last 10 years and tends to increase.

The PAHO representative in Peru, Manuel Peña, remarked that despite numerous aid campaigns and programs ascending to 250 million dollars annually, the numbers haven’t changed in years.

“The problem of child malnutrition will not be solved with better and more frequent nourishing”. Peña explained. It requires effective policies and actions from all parts of our society, integral nutritional interventions, and social investments focusing on the most vulnerable part of the population. We also need to improve the quality of education, public health care, and access to potable water and sanitation systems in order to increase productivity and the capacity of families to generate income”.

He said it’s necessary to consider the social determinants that affect children’s health: access to health services, houses that are connected to sanitation and sewage systems, potable water, vector control, nourishing security, consumption of iodized salt, adult alphabetization, education, etc.

The Peruvian regions with the highest levels of malnutrition are Cuzco with 50% of the population, followed by Huancavelica and Huánuco with 40% both. Peña recommended a strategy that focuses primarily on diminishing undernourishment in these areas.

The country’s common goal has to be reducing chronic undernourishment from 25% to 20% between 2006-2011, or one percent per year. In Peru the nationwide undernourishment level remained unimproved. It lowered in metropolitan areas but increased in rural and poorer areas which increased inequality among Peru’s population.

The statistics of the PAHO seem to be different than the numbers provided by the “Food and Agriculture Organization” (FAO) of the United Nations. Their 2006 analysis stated that Peru has a moderate level of undernourishment; 12 percent of the population is
undernourished. Both the proportion and the number of undernourished people have decreased from 1990-92, benchmark period of the World Food Summit (WFS) and the Millennium Declaration (MD), to 2002-04, the latest period available.

Article by Wolfy Becker

Senior adults in Lima, Peru will soon have free health care

Good news for all mature Peruvian adults: Beginning on April 1st 2007, Peruvian senior citizens will receive gratuitous medical attention at public hospitals in 22 districts of the capital of Lima.

This was announced on Monday by Peru’s health minister Carlos Vallejos, who explained that this is a pilot plan that offers integral medical attention to this vulnerable part of the population.

Vallejos said this service will initially be offered in the medical centers run by the Direction of Health (DISA) V – Lima City, which includes hospital in districts such as Cercado de Lima, Breña, Jesús María, Magdalena, San Miguel, La Victoria, San Luis, Lince, San Borja, Surquillo, San Isidro, Miraflores, Pueblo Libre, Puente Piedra, San Martín de Porres, Comas, Los Olivos, Rímac, Ancón, Independencia, Carabayllo and Canta.

The pilot plan also will also provide tips on therapies for various diseases and includes a prevention package for illnesses such arterial hypertension, diabetes, osteoporosis, cancer, and other common medical conditions older people have to deal with to minimize health risks.

According to the health ministry, 5,5% of all outpatient visits at state hospitals corresponds to mature adults, also known as the “third age”. However, estimates are that a large percentage d not receive any medical care due to the lack of economic resources. The objective of this pilot plan is to change that.

Wolfy Becker

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