Grenville to List on the Lima Stock Exchange

(official press release by Grenville Gold Corporation)

VANCOUVER, BC — February 26, 2007 — Grenville Gold Corporation (”Grenville” or “the Corporation”) is pleased to announce it has taken steps to begin the listing and trading of the company securities on the Peruvian stock exchange. The Bolsa De Valores De Lima (BVL) was founded in 1971, with the vision to be a leader in trading services, to facilitate funding and investment in the Peruvian capital market, with full integration into the international market.

The BVL currently lists over 250 companies, with over 1,300 average transactions per day. The exchange reached a market capitalization of over $60 million USD, in 2006. This marks an increase of over 165% from 2005.

Mining companies on the BVL make up over 25% of the current listings, with a market capitalization of over $15.7 million USD in 2006.

Grenville Gold Corp. is working with Intercapital Society of Peru, a registered agent of BVL, to complete the listing on behalf of the Corporation.

About Grenville Gold Corporation

Grenville Gold (www.grenvillegold.com) is a junior resource company seeking prospective properties in Peru and Ecuador. The company has three subsidiaries: Inversiones Mineras Alexander S.A.C. in Peru, Minera MineGrenville S.A. in Ecuador and Parkman Diamond Corp. in Ontario, Canada. Grenville Gold plans to leverage the experience of its Board and Management in exploration and mining to develop its growth strategy in North and South America. For further information contact 604-669-8842.

On behalf of the Board of Directors

“A. Paul Gill”
President & CEO

—————————————————-
DISCLAIMER: The content of each press release is the responsibility of the publishing organization and is not vetted or approved by JournalPeru.com prior to publication. JournalPeru.com is not liable directly or indirectly for any direct or consequential loss, damage or expense resulting from the material disseminated and published on the site. Readers are advised to check the accuracy of all press releases and to obtain their own professional advice in relation to such information.

16 percent of Peruvian HIV/AIDS patients are younger than 15

Since the early 1980’s HIV/AIDS has left and still leaves many ugly trails and tragedies. One of the worst – if not the worst – is the one of innocent adolescents. 16% of Peruvians that have to live with this infectuous disease are minors 15 years and younger. In many the virus was trasmitted through their parents and through sexual contact with an infected person, even at that age.However, for many experts fighting this epidemic disease, the main problem is not those who are already infected but those who are in danger and risk of contracting it.

Although 42% of Peruvian HIV/AIDS patients – according to UNAIDS, the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (in Spanish: Onusida) – are between 25 and 49 years old, official statistics reveal that the majority of them contracted the virus in their adolescence, early childhood or even before they were born. Adolescents are considered more vulnerable because of the lack of information and the beginning of sexual relations at an early age.

For Eduardo Blume from the NGO “Vía Libre”, the responsibility lies also with their parents, their teachers, authorities and society in general: “There are no studies which demonstrate that a correct and satisfactory sexual education occurs in Peruvian schools”.

According to Blume, the schools should take action because it is difficult to leave that task solely to the parents, since there are very few that talk with their children about sexual issues. The problem is that teachers are not enabled to educate and advise adolescents on this subject.

In addition to the teenagers who contracted HIV through sexual relations are the innocent victims that became infected through their mothers. Because of the advances of medicine they were able to look forward to a somewhat normal life, although they are not exempt from discrimination and other problems. The “El Hogar San Camilo” attends to 400-450 children who were born with HIV.

In the last decade, the home cared for more than a thousand children that were infected by their mothers. Some of them are soon entering adulthood. The first baby at San Camilo that was raised with human milk substitute is now eleven years old.

Another Peruvian organisation dedicated to attend HIV patients is “Punto J”. For more information please visit their website at http://www.puntoj.com.pe/.

Article by Wolfy Becker

Martin Chambi: Pictures speak more than a 1000 words…

… and in a land where analphabetism is rife, this is probably even more important. Yet another reason why Peruvians revere the photographer Martín Chambi, who with his camera captured manifold moments of Peruvian life for over 30 years.

(by Elise van der Heijden)

Those living in or visiting Cuzco can’t afford to miss out on a visit to the permanent Martín Chambi photography exhibition on the second floor of Scotiabank, on Maruri 315, 2 squares from the Plaza de Armas.

This remarkable artist, a direct Indian descendant born in the city of Puno in 1891, moved to Cuzco as a young man, and started his work there, leaving a legacy of photographs that paint the life of Peruvians of all standings between the 1920s and 1950s. Apart from taking more official and well-paid photos of important weddings and public and private events, he was very good at portraying how life was for the majority of Peruvians; peasants, street vendors, students, and middle class families.

This exhibition includes Cuzco street scenes, beautiful landscapes, including Machu Picchu shortly after it had been discovered, wedding and family portraits of important Cuzco families, and a collection of photos taken in his private studio, including the famous photo of the “giant of Paruro”, a gigantic peasant Chambi met during his travels in rural Peru.

Spending some time exploring this exhibition will take you on a journey through Peru´s past, where you will experience the many aspects of Peruvian life of Chambi’s era, condensed into his vivid black and white photographs.

The photographs show how much, and in many cases how little has changed since Chambi’s era: the peasants of today mostly dress in the same way as back then, but today they enjoy the comfort of shoes whereas back then most went barefoot; the rich with their domestic servants, the only difference with today being that they now communicate with their servants by mobile phone; Cuzco’s colonial and pre-Colombian architecture mostly preserved in its original state until today, but today’s image offers an additional merging of different cultures: the locals offering their wares and services to those visiting from abroad. After you have decided to visit the exhibition, you will undoubtedly agree that the above 1000 words do not come close to expressing what his photographs can.

Exhibition:

Scotiabank 2nd floor, former Palacio Inka Tupac Yupanqui, Maruri 315, Cusco

Entrance: 10 soles.

Opening times:
Monday to Friday: 9.30 am – 1.30 pm & 4 pm – 6.30 pm
Saturday: 9.15 am to 12.30 am

Photographs: martinchambri.com

Aircraft Inspection Services

ray-tail-inspectionAircraft inspection is a vital part of any air transport service. With the rigors of air travel, an aircraft goes through a good deal of wear and tear every time it takes off and touches down, and obviously in between. Regular maintenance checks ensure not just the safety of everyone on board, but also efficient and comfortable transport. The best private jet charters conduct frequent aircraft inspections to make sure the entire fleet runs smoothly and that any problems are caught and fixed early on.

Fortunately, maintenance services can easily be sourced from a number of companies and charter services. Maintenance services help companies make sure that all their aircraft is fit for travel at all times, and any damaged or problematic ones are fixed and ready to fly as soon as possible. Downtime for a single aircraft can be very costly, so it’s always in a company’s best interests to find and fix problems with the shortest delay. This is true for all sorts of damage, from minor dents and scratches to engine failures.

A mobile service can also be valuable, especially for fleets that experience high traffic and heavy use on a regular basis. With a traveling maintenance team, you can get any repair or inspection services you need right away, without having to get to your home base—all the services are provided on the go and you’ll be back on the road in no time. This further reduces flight delays and allows you to make the most of your travel time, whether on short trips or around the world.

For a growing fleet, another important service to consider is aircraft appraisal, or the inspection of aircraft to make sure they meet official quality and performance standards and are worth their advertised or published value. This is useful for buying and selling purposes, as well as overall quality assurance. A reputable provider will offer appraisals approved by the Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP), ensuring a reliable professional opinion.

Other important aircraft maintenance services include battery replacements and testing, parts replacement, troubleshooting and repair of navigation and communication tools, equipment upgrades, and interior maintenance. To compete in today’s market, aircraft charters need to stay on top of the game with the latest technologies, but also make sure that safety, quality and comfort are not sacrificed. All these can be costly, but well worth the price with the right provider.

Martin’s vision: The Amazon Swim. From Atalaya, Peru to Belem, Brazil

My name is Martin Strel. I’m from a very small but beautiful country called Slovenia. It’s a small country, a tiny country, but over the last 6 years, I, for one, have set myself and achieved, some incredibly large goals:

– To be the first and only person to swim the Danube river – 1877 miles (3021 km).
– The first and only person to swim the Mississippi river – 2360 miles (3798 km).
– The first and only person to swim the Yangtze river in China – 2500 miles (4023 km).

And I have come at last to what looks like the impossible challenge of being the first and only person to swim the Amazon river.

From close to its source in Atalaya, Peru, to where it spills out of the Amazon Basin into the Atlantic, at Belem, Brazil. Some 3375 miles (5430 km).

No one has ever done this… I know that I’m going against almost insurmountable odds, but I have my reasons.

Some of which I’m going to tell you about.

The Amazon river flows mainly through the rainforests of Peru and Brazil, some of the most beautiful, most diverse and potentially, the most impacting (in a positive way) ecosystem on our planet. There are hundreds of tribes living in that rainforest, some of whom have never seen the light of the modern day world. And there are thousands of species of animals and medicinal plants, many of them, scientists believe, hold the keys to solving some of our greatest illnesses. Natural compounds that could hold a cure for cancer, malaria, and HIV/AIDS.

The Amazon rainforest, and it’s river, is also home to some of the most poisonous, dangerous and ferocious animals that we know of. And a lot more that we don’t know of. I’ve said many times to myself and others that I’m going to swim that river or die trying… And I mean that quite literally. I could die in that river, but that is not my intention. My intention is to swim through the rainforest in order to prove something.

In 1963, Dr. Martin Luther King had a dream that changed our world.

I, too, have a dream. I, too, have a vision, that I hope will change our world. My dream is to swim the Amazon to prove to the world that nothing… nothing, is impossible.

If I can swim that river, then the Palestinians and the Israeli’s can find a way to live together in peace.

If I can swim that river, then the Muslims, Christians, and Hindus, in India and Africa and the Middle East, can all find a way to live together in peace.

If I can swim that river, then the Western Nations and the Nations of Iran and Iraq and Afghanistan, can find a way to live together in peace.

If I can swim that river, then the Chinese government can allow the sovereign of Tibet, the Dalai Lama, to return to his throne in his own country, and they can all live together in peace.

If I can swim that river, then the warring tribes in north and central Africa, who are squabbling over resources, land, and water, while their people starve and die, can find a way to live together in peace.

If I can swim that river, then the 8 most powerful and richest countries in the world can find a way to forgive the debts of the 15 poorest countries in the world.

This is the goal I have set myself and this is the challenge that I have put out there for the world’s leaders, and the religious leaders, the politicians, and the militia men, to rise up to. If I can achieve my goal, they can achieve this.

This is what I will have in mind in the darkest days of that swim, in the most arduous hours, that in some way I am helping to protect, not only myself from the hazards of the river, but the rainforest from the hazards of the rapid deforestation, exploitation, and pollution, that is threatening thousands of indigenous natives, the rainforest ecosystem, and our environment as a whole.

As you can see, it’s not just the rainforest but our whole world that needs to be protected. So that people can live together in peace without the fear of famine, and violence, and war. For all these reasons, I am going to swim that river.

I used to talk in terms of conquering rivers. But that’s not what happens at all. I haven’t conquered any rivers, what I’ve been conquering is myself. My own limitations, that are mostly in my head. This is, I believe, the only way forward for all of us. Each one of us has to find a way to conquer our pride, our vanity and greed, our corruption and striving for power. Find a way to live in peace and dignity with ourselves, and then we can live in peace and dignity with each other.

I’ve received so much good will and best wishes from people all over the world. And I wish to return those wishes and that goodwill with my own. Because this is not just about me surviving in that river, but of us, surviving on this tiny little blue droplet of water, suspended in the boundless void of space.

This place that we call our world, our home, the planet Earth.

Martin Strel

————————————————————————

Martin’s endeavor will begin on Thursday, February 1st, when he jumps into the Amazon river at Atalaya, Peru, for his first 85 kilometer stage to Taurapa. His plan is to swim 77.5 km (48 miles) on average per day, without a singe resting day.

After 70 days, on April 11h, he is expected to arrive at the Amazon delta in Belém, Brazil.

Good luck, amigo!

Journal Peru will keep you informed about Martin’s progress, his overall state of health, and when he reaches his final destination: the Atlantic Ocean.

Grenville to List on the Lima Stock Exchange

(official press release by Grenville Gold Corporation)

VANCOUVER, BC — February 26, 2007 — Grenville Gold Corporation (”Grenville” or “the Corporation”) is pleased to announce it has taken steps to begin the listing and trading of the company securities on the Peruvian stock exchange. The Bolsa De Valores De Lima (BVL) was founded in 1971, with the vision to be a leader in trading services, to facilitate funding and investment in the Peruvian capital market, with full integration into the international market.

The BVL currently lists over 250 companies, with over 1,300 average transactions per day. The exchange reached a market capitalization of over $60 million USD, in 2006. This marks an increase of over 165% from 2005.

Mining companies on the BVL make up over 25% of the current listings, with a market capitalization of over $15.7 million USD in 2006.

Grenville Gold Corp. is working with Intercapital Society of Peru, a registered agent of BVL, to complete the listing on behalf of the Corporation.

About Grenville Gold Corporation

Grenville Gold (www.grenvillegold.com) is a junior resource company seeking prospective properties in Peru and Ecuador. The company has three subsidiaries: Inversiones Mineras Alexander S.A.C. in Peru, Minera MineGrenville S.A. in Ecuador and Parkman Diamond Corp. in Ontario, Canada. Grenville Gold plans to leverage the experience of its Board and Management in exploration and mining to develop its growth strategy in North and South America. For further information contact 604-669-8842.

On behalf of the Board of Directors

“A. Paul Gill”
President & CEO

—————————————————-
DISCLAIMER: The content of each press release is the responsibility of the publishing organization and is not vetted or approved by JournalPeru.com prior to publication. JournalPeru.com is not liable directly or indirectly for any direct or consequential loss, damage or expense resulting from the material disseminated and published on the site. Readers are advised to check the accuracy of all press releases and to obtain their own professional advice in relation to such information.

16 percent of Peruvian HIV/AIDS patients are younger than 15

Since the early 1980’s HIV/AIDS has left and still leaves many ugly trails and tragedies. One of the worst – if not the worst – is the one of innocent adolescents. 16% of Peruvians that have to live with this infectuous disease are minors 15 years and younger. In many the virus was trasmitted through their parents and through sexual contact with an infected person, even at that age.However, for many experts fighting this epidemic disease, the main problem is not those who are already infected but those who are in danger and risk of contracting it.

Although 42% of Peruvian HIV/AIDS patients – according to UNAIDS, the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (in Spanish: Onusida) – are between 25 and 49 years old, official statistics reveal that the majority of them contracted the virus in their adolescence, early childhood or even before they were born. Adolescents are considered more vulnerable because of the lack of information and the beginning of sexual relations at an early age.

For Eduardo Blume from the NGO “Vía Libre”, the responsibility lies also with their parents, their teachers, authorities and society in general: “There are no studies which demonstrate that a correct and satisfactory sexual education occurs in Peruvian schools”.

According to Blume, the schools should take action because it is difficult to leave that task solely to the parents, since there are very few that talk with their children about sexual issues. The problem is that teachers are not enabled to educate and advise adolescents on this subject.

In addition to the teenagers who contracted HIV through sexual relations are the innocent victims that became infected through their mothers. Because of the advances of medicine they were able to look forward to a somewhat normal life, although they are not exempt from discrimination and other problems. The “El Hogar San Camilo” attends to 400-450 children who were born with HIV.

In the last decade, the home cared for more than a thousand children that were infected by their mothers. Some of them are soon entering adulthood. The first baby at San Camilo that was raised with human milk substitute is now eleven years old.

Another Peruvian organisation dedicated to attend HIV patients is “Punto J”. For more information please visit their website at http://www.puntoj.com.pe/.

Article by Wolfy Becker

Martin Chambi: Pictures speak more than a 1000 words…

… and in a land where analphabetism is rife, this is probably even more important. Yet another reason why Peruvians revere the photographer Martín Chambi, who with his camera captured manifold moments of Peruvian life for over 30 years.

(by Elise van der Heijden)

Those living in or visiting Cuzco can’t afford to miss out on a visit to the permanent Martín Chambi photography exhibition on the second floor of Scotiabank, on Maruri 315, 2 squares from the Plaza de Armas.

This remarkable artist, a direct Indian descendant born in the city of Puno in 1891, moved to Cuzco as a young man, and started his work there, leaving a legacy of photographs that paint the life of Peruvians of all standings between the 1920s and 1950s. Apart from taking more official and well-paid photos of important weddings and public and private events, he was very good at portraying how life was for the majority of Peruvians; peasants, street vendors, students, and middle class families.

This exhibition includes Cuzco street scenes, beautiful landscapes, including Machu Picchu shortly after it had been discovered, wedding and family portraits of important Cuzco families, and a collection of photos taken in his private studio, including the famous photo of the “giant of Paruro”, a gigantic peasant Chambi met during his travels in rural Peru.

Spending some time exploring this exhibition will take you on a journey through Peru´s past, where you will experience the many aspects of Peruvian life of Chambi’s era, condensed into his vivid black and white photographs.

The photographs show how much, and in many cases how little has changed since Chambi’s era: the peasants of today mostly dress in the same way as back then, but today they enjoy the comfort of shoes whereas back then most went barefoot; the rich with their domestic servants, the only difference with today being that they now communicate with their servants by mobile phone; Cuzco’s colonial and pre-Colombian architecture mostly preserved in its original state until today, but today’s image offers an additional merging of different cultures: the locals offering their wares and services to those visiting from abroad. After you have decided to visit the exhibition, you will undoubtedly agree that the above 1000 words do not come close to expressing what his photographs can.

Exhibition:

Scotiabank 2nd floor, former Palacio Inka Tupac Yupanqui, Maruri 315, Cusco

Entrance: 10 soles.

Opening times:
Monday to Friday: 9.30 am – 1.30 pm & 4 pm – 6.30 pm
Saturday: 9.15 am to 12.30 am

Photographs: martinchambri.com

Aircraft Inspection Services

ray-tail-inspectionAircraft inspection is a vital part of any air transport service. With the rigors of air travel, an aircraft goes through a good deal of wear and tear every time it takes off and touches down, and obviously in between. Regular maintenance checks ensure not just the safety of everyone on board, but also efficient and comfortable transport. The best private jet charters conduct frequent aircraft inspections to make sure the entire fleet runs smoothly and that any problems are caught and fixed early on.

Fortunately, maintenance services can easily be sourced from a number of companies and charter services. Maintenance services help companies make sure that all their aircraft is fit for travel at all times, and any damaged or problematic ones are fixed and ready to fly as soon as possible. Downtime for a single aircraft can be very costly, so it’s always in a company’s best interests to find and fix problems with the shortest delay. This is true for all sorts of damage, from minor dents and scratches to engine failures.

A mobile service can also be valuable, especially for fleets that experience high traffic and heavy use on a regular basis. With a traveling maintenance team, you can get any repair or inspection services you need right away, without having to get to your home base—all the services are provided on the go and you’ll be back on the road in no time. This further reduces flight delays and allows you to make the most of your travel time, whether on short trips or around the world.

For a growing fleet, another important service to consider is aircraft appraisal, or the inspection of aircraft to make sure they meet official quality and performance standards and are worth their advertised or published value. This is useful for buying and selling purposes, as well as overall quality assurance. A reputable provider will offer appraisals approved by the Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP), ensuring a reliable professional opinion.

Other important aircraft maintenance services include battery replacements and testing, parts replacement, troubleshooting and repair of navigation and communication tools, equipment upgrades, and interior maintenance. To compete in today’s market, aircraft charters need to stay on top of the game with the latest technologies, but also make sure that safety, quality and comfort are not sacrificed. All these can be costly, but well worth the price with the right provider.

Martin’s vision: The Amazon Swim. From Atalaya, Peru to Belem, Brazil

My name is Martin Strel. I’m from a very small but beautiful country called Slovenia. It’s a small country, a tiny country, but over the last 6 years, I, for one, have set myself and achieved, some incredibly large goals:

– To be the first and only person to swim the Danube river – 1877 miles (3021 km).
– The first and only person to swim the Mississippi river – 2360 miles (3798 km).
– The first and only person to swim the Yangtze river in China – 2500 miles (4023 km).

And I have come at last to what looks like the impossible challenge of being the first and only person to swim the Amazon river.

From close to its source in Atalaya, Peru, to where it spills out of the Amazon Basin into the Atlantic, at Belem, Brazil. Some 3375 miles (5430 km).

No one has ever done this… I know that I’m going against almost insurmountable odds, but I have my reasons.

Some of which I’m going to tell you about.

The Amazon river flows mainly through the rainforests of Peru and Brazil, some of the most beautiful, most diverse and potentially, the most impacting (in a positive way) ecosystem on our planet. There are hundreds of tribes living in that rainforest, some of whom have never seen the light of the modern day world. And there are thousands of species of animals and medicinal plants, many of them, scientists believe, hold the keys to solving some of our greatest illnesses. Natural compounds that could hold a cure for cancer, malaria, and HIV/AIDS.

The Amazon rainforest, and it’s river, is also home to some of the most poisonous, dangerous and ferocious animals that we know of. And a lot more that we don’t know of. I’ve said many times to myself and others that I’m going to swim that river or die trying… And I mean that quite literally. I could die in that river, but that is not my intention. My intention is to swim through the rainforest in order to prove something.

In 1963, Dr. Martin Luther King had a dream that changed our world.

I, too, have a dream. I, too, have a vision, that I hope will change our world. My dream is to swim the Amazon to prove to the world that nothing… nothing, is impossible.

If I can swim that river, then the Palestinians and the Israeli’s can find a way to live together in peace.

If I can swim that river, then the Muslims, Christians, and Hindus, in India and Africa and the Middle East, can all find a way to live together in peace.

If I can swim that river, then the Western Nations and the Nations of Iran and Iraq and Afghanistan, can find a way to live together in peace.

If I can swim that river, then the Chinese government can allow the sovereign of Tibet, the Dalai Lama, to return to his throne in his own country, and they can all live together in peace.

If I can swim that river, then the warring tribes in north and central Africa, who are squabbling over resources, land, and water, while their people starve and die, can find a way to live together in peace.

If I can swim that river, then the 8 most powerful and richest countries in the world can find a way to forgive the debts of the 15 poorest countries in the world.

This is the goal I have set myself and this is the challenge that I have put out there for the world’s leaders, and the religious leaders, the politicians, and the militia men, to rise up to. If I can achieve my goal, they can achieve this.

This is what I will have in mind in the darkest days of that swim, in the most arduous hours, that in some way I am helping to protect, not only myself from the hazards of the river, but the rainforest from the hazards of the rapid deforestation, exploitation, and pollution, that is threatening thousands of indigenous natives, the rainforest ecosystem, and our environment as a whole.

As you can see, it’s not just the rainforest but our whole world that needs to be protected. So that people can live together in peace without the fear of famine, and violence, and war. For all these reasons, I am going to swim that river.

I used to talk in terms of conquering rivers. But that’s not what happens at all. I haven’t conquered any rivers, what I’ve been conquering is myself. My own limitations, that are mostly in my head. This is, I believe, the only way forward for all of us. Each one of us has to find a way to conquer our pride, our vanity and greed, our corruption and striving for power. Find a way to live in peace and dignity with ourselves, and then we can live in peace and dignity with each other.

I’ve received so much good will and best wishes from people all over the world. And I wish to return those wishes and that goodwill with my own. Because this is not just about me surviving in that river, but of us, surviving on this tiny little blue droplet of water, suspended in the boundless void of space.

This place that we call our world, our home, the planet Earth.

Martin Strel

————————————————————————

Martin’s endeavor will begin on Thursday, February 1st, when he jumps into the Amazon river at Atalaya, Peru, for his first 85 kilometer stage to Taurapa. His plan is to swim 77.5 km (48 miles) on average per day, without a singe resting day.

After 70 days, on April 11h, he is expected to arrive at the Amazon delta in Belém, Brazil.

Good luck, amigo!

Journal Peru will keep you informed about Martin’s progress, his overall state of health, and when he reaches his final destination: the Atlantic Ocean.

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