Where to stay in Peru

Due to the expanding tourist industry in Peru, there are now a wide variety of places in which those visiting this country can stay. That’s not to say that you’re likely to find yourself in an ultra-modern hotel complex, surrounded by other tourists – there are still plenty if remote and traditional places to stay if that’s what you’re looking for.

It is important to bare in mind exactly what you want from your accommodation choice, as well as your holiday in general. The rich culture to be found in this country often makes it a popular choice for those who are backpacking across South America. Backpackers often favour hostel-style accommodation, which can usually booked at the last minute.

Although hostels sometimes get the reputation of only offering the most basic of facilities, it is often possible to find hostels with rooms as comfortable as those you might find online. Such hostels are usually a lot less expensive than many other types of accommodation, and perfect for those who are just looking for somewhere to spend the night.

On the other hand, Peru is also able to offer a range of luxurious hotels and villas for those looking for a more relaxing break. Many boast stunning surroundings and spa facilities, whilst maintaining many traditional features.

Peru offers accommodation options to suit every budget. However, as always, it is worth considering your holiday priorities when making your booking. Is it important, for example, that you are close to local amenities? Or are you more likely to relish the opportunity to stay somewhere a bit more remote? It is also a good idea to check that your accommodation is child-friendly if you are visiting with a family.

Things That You Are Suppose to Know Before Trekking the Inca Trail

If you are considering planning a holiday to Peru and you want to include a trek of the famous Inca Trail then there are a few things that you should consider before you make the trip.  Peru is a beautiful country to visit however you need to be prepared and have done a little research before embarking on a trek in this country. Always make sure that you have travel insurance organised before you leave for your trip, just in case.

The first thing that any potential traveller to Peru should do is to research the best times of the year to travel and to trek in Peru.  The Inca Trail is a popular tourist draw card so peak season can be quite busy with tourists.  When deciding on dates to travel it is also important to consider the climate and the weather in the areas that you will be trekking and staying.

Another important thing to do before you book your trek is to do some research about the Inca Trail and also the areas that the trail passes through.  Researching on the internet or looking through travel guides can give you ideas about areas to visit and look out for along the trail.  This research will also make sure that you don’t miss anything good.

For travellers who are going to trek the Inca Trail you need to book through a tour operator as you cannot walk the trail without a guide. You also need a permit from the Peruvian authorities to gain access to the Inca Trail as the authorities issue these permits as a way of regulating the number of people on the Inca Trail each day. You organise your permit through the agency you will trek with.  Make sure you book well in advance as it can sometimes be difficult to secure a trek at the time you want to especially in peak tourist season if you have not prebooked.

Before considering a trekking holiday, especially one as challenging as the Inca Trail you should consider your health and fitness.  What makes the Inca Trail so challenging is the altitude as well as the steep assents and descents so fitness and health is important.  If you have health issues or are generally unfit then a trekking holiday in Peru may not be the best choice for a holiday destination.

Going to Nazca Peru: How To See The Nazca Lines For Real

For Peru, the Nazca Lines and the ancient ruins of Machu Picchu are the two most well know tourist attractions in the country.  The Nazca Lines and also the various pictures are etched into the desert area which is south of Nazca and is believed to be over 2,000 years old.  The lines and the various pictures where discovered in the 1920s and where originally thought to be the work of the Incas however they are now believed to be much older.  Despite investigations, discoveries of mummies and ceramics found in the area of the Nazca Lines very little is known about the origin or the meaning of these lines and pictures in the desert.

The Nazca Lines, huge trapezoids, animal figures and the long straight lines are etched into the ground over an area of the desert which is 500 square kilometres.  What is so amazing about these lines and also the pictures is the complexity of the designs and also to length of many of lines which can be over 7 kilometres in length.  The best way to experience the beauty and the wonder of the Nazca Lines is to fly over the area in either a plane or helicopter.

There are many tour operators to choose from when booking flights to see the Nazca Lines from the air and many have the flexibility of booking a flight with or without a planned tour.  Many flights leave early in the morning which is the best time to see the pictures and lines from the air and also the best time for photography of the area.  Flights over the Nazca Lines are a very popular tourist activity so many people book in advance to make sure that they don’t miss out.

The Nazca lines are best viewed from the air however visiting this area on foot is also an interesting experience.  Viewing the lines from the ground gives you a sense of the size and the huge area that the lines, symbols and pictures cover.  Visiting the desert also shows you how the lines were created.  The lines and the pictures were created by clearing the darkened Pampa stones that cover this desert area to expose the lighter sand underneath.

If you are planning a holiday that includes visiting Peru then it is highly recommended that you book  flight to view the Nazca Lines.  This experience will be a memorable one so remember to take your camera.

Peru Adventure Travel

There’s no shortage of options when it comes to Peru adventure travel, from the snow-capped peaks of the Andes and glacial lakes to the ethereal cloud forests, surrounding ruins that have stood for millennia. Peru offers lots of opportunities to leave your comfort zone and do some real learning, while enjoying every minute. The beauty of it is that you don’t have to go far—whether in the confines of the capital or deep in the jungle, there are places that can take your breath away.

A popular first choice is the scenic Inca Trail leading to Machu Picchu, easily one of the world’s best. The Inca Discovery Tour combines the four-day trek with a cultural and archeological tour where you get to sample local cuisine, shop at local markets, and explore the famous Inca ruins. The hiking part is far from easy, but it’s all worth it when you reach your destination and watch the sunrise over the Incan ruins.

Horseback riding is a little-known but fast-growing activity, particularly in Cusco where jungles and nature reserves are abundant. Cusilluchayoq, one of three ancient adoration sites east of Cusco, boasts a mesh of quiet, scenic trails where you can’t help but feel one with the environment. The other two sites, Laqo and Lanlakuyoq, are also worth a look—all three feature rocks carved with animal images believed to be part of an ancient ritual. A number of “spiritual tours” have turned up in recent years, most of them centered around this area.

The Urubamba River just south of the Cusco ruins is a popular site for river rafting. The northern bend, known as the Cusipata Region, features grade II to IV rapids and offers great views of the Andes and the countryside. Another stretch, the Ollantaytambo, sits right on the Sacred Valley and is also worth a look. However, as it’s also a common starting point for the Inca Trail, it can be a bit crowded during peak season.

Northern Peru is often overlooked but rich in its own right, housing the peaks and lagoons of the Cordillera Blanca mountain range. Reaching heights of over 6,000 feet and covered with snow throughout the year, they make for a strenuous but rewarding hike. Parts of it can only be reached by trekking or a horseback ride from the neighboring town of Caraz. If you can, try to make time for a lengthy trek—lots of spots are too beautiful to pass up, and each one deserves more than a passing glance.

Peru Treks

The Andes is to trekkers what Dom Pérignon is to wine lovers: you have to do it at least once in your life. Peru is home to some of its highest peaks, making it a must-see for anyone with even a passing interest in the outdoors. Indeed, staying in Peru without swinging by one of its hiking trails is like going to Paris and completely missing the Eiffel Tower.

The most popular route is easily the Classic Inca Trail, a journey through mountain scenery, pristine forest, and the historic slopes of Machu Picchu, ending with a view of the ruins over the Sun Gate. But take note: although most first-time visitors opt for this trail, it’s far from being the easiest. The Short Inca Trail, which can be completed in one day instead of four, is a good alternative if you want to take it easy or just don’t have the time to kill.

There are other trails worth looking at, such as the Lares Trek, where you can pause and mingle with locals on the way to the peaks. The Salkantay Trek includes nightly stops at strategically placed lodges for those who aren’t into camping.

If you’ve already seen Machu Picchu or want to explore the literally less-trodden path, start with Choquequirao—a cluster of buildings and terraces similar in style, scale, and historic value to Machu Picchu itself. Located further west of Cusco, it gets far fewer visitors than Macchu Picchu, although it gained some popularity after a footbridge was built over the Apurimac River. It’s a challenging 5-day trek, but it’s well worth the effort.

History buffs should definitely have a look at Chachapoyas, home to an ancient civilization of the same name. Also known as the “Cloud People of Peru,” they carved their entire city into the Andes mountains some 1,000 years ago, although much of the ruins and some of the bodies remained hidden until 2008. The Chachapoyas hike will take you through the large but elusive Kuelap fortress, sarcophagus halls, and a recently discovered waterfall that towers at 770 feet, the third highest in the world.

If pretty sights are more your thing, book a four-day hike through the snow-capped mountains of Cordillera Blanca (White Range) in Santa Cruz. The Alpamayo, a mid-range peak, was once said to be the world’s most beautiful mountain, and the deep turquoise Laguna Parón is said to be the world’s most beautiful glacial lagoon. Other must-sees are the Laguna Santa Cruz, nestled under the Alpamayo, and the Laguna Chinancocha and Orconcocha, which glisten a stunning turquoise green.

Where to stay in Peru

Due to the expanding tourist industry in Peru, there are now a wide variety of places in which those visiting this country can stay. That’s not to say that you’re likely to find yourself in an ultra-modern hotel complex, surrounded by other tourists – there are still plenty if remote and traditional places to stay if that’s what you’re looking for.

It is important to bare in mind exactly what you want from your accommodation choice, as well as your holiday in general. The rich culture to be found in this country often makes it a popular choice for those who are backpacking across South America. Backpackers often favour hostel-style accommodation, which can usually booked at the last minute.

Although hostels sometimes get the reputation of only offering the most basic of facilities, it is often possible to find hostels with rooms as comfortable as those you might find online. Such hostels are usually a lot less expensive than many other types of accommodation, and perfect for those who are just looking for somewhere to spend the night.

On the other hand, Peru is also able to offer a range of luxurious hotels and villas for those looking for a more relaxing break. Many boast stunning surroundings and spa facilities, whilst maintaining many traditional features.

Peru offers accommodation options to suit every budget. However, as always, it is worth considering your holiday priorities when making your booking. Is it important, for example, that you are close to local amenities? Or are you more likely to relish the opportunity to stay somewhere a bit more remote? It is also a good idea to check that your accommodation is child-friendly if you are visiting with a family.

Things That You Are Suppose to Know Before Trekking the Inca Trail

If you are considering planning a holiday to Peru and you want to include a trek of the famous Inca Trail then there are a few things that you should consider before you make the trip.  Peru is a beautiful country to visit however you need to be prepared and have done a little research before embarking on a trek in this country. Always make sure that you have travel insurance organised before you leave for your trip, just in case.

The first thing that any potential traveller to Peru should do is to research the best times of the year to travel and to trek in Peru.  The Inca Trail is a popular tourist draw card so peak season can be quite busy with tourists.  When deciding on dates to travel it is also important to consider the climate and the weather in the areas that you will be trekking and staying.

Another important thing to do before you book your trek is to do some research about the Inca Trail and also the areas that the trail passes through.  Researching on the internet or looking through travel guides can give you ideas about areas to visit and look out for along the trail.  This research will also make sure that you don’t miss anything good.

For travellers who are going to trek the Inca Trail you need to book through a tour operator as you cannot walk the trail without a guide. You also need a permit from the Peruvian authorities to gain access to the Inca Trail as the authorities issue these permits as a way of regulating the number of people on the Inca Trail each day. You organise your permit through the agency you will trek with.  Make sure you book well in advance as it can sometimes be difficult to secure a trek at the time you want to especially in peak tourist season if you have not prebooked.

Before considering a trekking holiday, especially one as challenging as the Inca Trail you should consider your health and fitness.  What makes the Inca Trail so challenging is the altitude as well as the steep assents and descents so fitness and health is important.  If you have health issues or are generally unfit then a trekking holiday in Peru may not be the best choice for a holiday destination.

Going to Nazca Peru: How To See The Nazca Lines For Real

For Peru, the Nazca Lines and the ancient ruins of Machu Picchu are the two most well know tourist attractions in the country.  The Nazca Lines and also the various pictures are etched into the desert area which is south of Nazca and is believed to be over 2,000 years old.  The lines and the various pictures where discovered in the 1920s and where originally thought to be the work of the Incas however they are now believed to be much older.  Despite investigations, discoveries of mummies and ceramics found in the area of the Nazca Lines very little is known about the origin or the meaning of these lines and pictures in the desert.

The Nazca Lines, huge trapezoids, animal figures and the long straight lines are etched into the ground over an area of the desert which is 500 square kilometres.  What is so amazing about these lines and also the pictures is the complexity of the designs and also to length of many of lines which can be over 7 kilometres in length.  The best way to experience the beauty and the wonder of the Nazca Lines is to fly over the area in either a plane or helicopter.

There are many tour operators to choose from when booking flights to see the Nazca Lines from the air and many have the flexibility of booking a flight with or without a planned tour.  Many flights leave early in the morning which is the best time to see the pictures and lines from the air and also the best time for photography of the area.  Flights over the Nazca Lines are a very popular tourist activity so many people book in advance to make sure that they don’t miss out.

The Nazca lines are best viewed from the air however visiting this area on foot is also an interesting experience.  Viewing the lines from the ground gives you a sense of the size and the huge area that the lines, symbols and pictures cover.  Visiting the desert also shows you how the lines were created.  The lines and the pictures were created by clearing the darkened Pampa stones that cover this desert area to expose the lighter sand underneath.

If you are planning a holiday that includes visiting Peru then it is highly recommended that you book  flight to view the Nazca Lines.  This experience will be a memorable one so remember to take your camera.

Peru Adventure Travel

There’s no shortage of options when it comes to Peru adventure travel, from the snow-capped peaks of the Andes and glacial lakes to the ethereal cloud forests, surrounding ruins that have stood for millennia. Peru offers lots of opportunities to leave your comfort zone and do some real learning, while enjoying every minute. The beauty of it is that you don’t have to go far—whether in the confines of the capital or deep in the jungle, there are places that can take your breath away.

A popular first choice is the scenic Inca Trail leading to Machu Picchu, easily one of the world’s best. The Inca Discovery Tour combines the four-day trek with a cultural and archeological tour where you get to sample local cuisine, shop at local markets, and explore the famous Inca ruins. The hiking part is far from easy, but it’s all worth it when you reach your destination and watch the sunrise over the Incan ruins.

Horseback riding is a little-known but fast-growing activity, particularly in Cusco where jungles and nature reserves are abundant. Cusilluchayoq, one of three ancient adoration sites east of Cusco, boasts a mesh of quiet, scenic trails where you can’t help but feel one with the environment. The other two sites, Laqo and Lanlakuyoq, are also worth a look—all three feature rocks carved with animal images believed to be part of an ancient ritual. A number of “spiritual tours” have turned up in recent years, most of them centered around this area.

The Urubamba River just south of the Cusco ruins is a popular site for river rafting. The northern bend, known as the Cusipata Region, features grade II to IV rapids and offers great views of the Andes and the countryside. Another stretch, the Ollantaytambo, sits right on the Sacred Valley and is also worth a look. However, as it’s also a common starting point for the Inca Trail, it can be a bit crowded during peak season.

Northern Peru is often overlooked but rich in its own right, housing the peaks and lagoons of the Cordillera Blanca mountain range. Reaching heights of over 6,000 feet and covered with snow throughout the year, they make for a strenuous but rewarding hike. Parts of it can only be reached by trekking or a horseback ride from the neighboring town of Caraz. If you can, try to make time for a lengthy trek—lots of spots are too beautiful to pass up, and each one deserves more than a passing glance.

Peru Treks

The Andes is to trekkers what Dom Pérignon is to wine lovers: you have to do it at least once in your life. Peru is home to some of its highest peaks, making it a must-see for anyone with even a passing interest in the outdoors. Indeed, staying in Peru without swinging by one of its hiking trails is like going to Paris and completely missing the Eiffel Tower.

The most popular route is easily the Classic Inca Trail, a journey through mountain scenery, pristine forest, and the historic slopes of Machu Picchu, ending with a view of the ruins over the Sun Gate. But take note: although most first-time visitors opt for this trail, it’s far from being the easiest. The Short Inca Trail, which can be completed in one day instead of four, is a good alternative if you want to take it easy or just don’t have the time to kill.

There are other trails worth looking at, such as the Lares Trek, where you can pause and mingle with locals on the way to the peaks. The Salkantay Trek includes nightly stops at strategically placed lodges for those who aren’t into camping.

If you’ve already seen Machu Picchu or want to explore the literally less-trodden path, start with Choquequirao—a cluster of buildings and terraces similar in style, scale, and historic value to Machu Picchu itself. Located further west of Cusco, it gets far fewer visitors than Macchu Picchu, although it gained some popularity after a footbridge was built over the Apurimac River. It’s a challenging 5-day trek, but it’s well worth the effort.

History buffs should definitely have a look at Chachapoyas, home to an ancient civilization of the same name. Also known as the “Cloud People of Peru,” they carved their entire city into the Andes mountains some 1,000 years ago, although much of the ruins and some of the bodies remained hidden until 2008. The Chachapoyas hike will take you through the large but elusive Kuelap fortress, sarcophagus halls, and a recently discovered waterfall that towers at 770 feet, the third highest in the world.

If pretty sights are more your thing, book a four-day hike through the snow-capped mountains of Cordillera Blanca (White Range) in Santa Cruz. The Alpamayo, a mid-range peak, was once said to be the world’s most beautiful mountain, and the deep turquoise Laguna Parón is said to be the world’s most beautiful glacial lagoon. Other must-sees are the Laguna Santa Cruz, nestled under the Alpamayo, and the Laguna Chinancocha and Orconcocha, which glisten a stunning turquoise green.

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